1700 Houston
1700 Houston
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2100 Common
2100 Common
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Private Property
Private Property
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Milam
Milam
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1200 Jefferson
1200 Jefferson
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1300 Eagle
1300 Eagle
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1500 Studewood
1500 Studewood
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19 LEWIS 29
19 LEWIS 29
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600 14th 700
600 14th 700
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Remington Lane
Remington Lane
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1100 Rusk
1100 Rusk
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2300 Kirby
2300 Kirby
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Smith
Smith
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Caroline
Caroline
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800 La Green
800 La Green
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Gray
Gray
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800 W. Capitol
800 W. Capitol
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Morningside
Morningside
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"Bring the blue tiles back to the Bayou City."

About the Project:

The idea of the Blue Tile Project is to become a conduit of all things Houston. 

One day on what seemed like a typical bike ride around Houston for Joey and Kelly Sanchez, an idea was crafted. The two began photographing all of the blue tile street signs along their route.   This led to uncover these hidden hems all over the city of Houston. As a result, on May 1, 2015,  the Blue Tile Project was born.

 

As Houstonians began responding and sharing the 

#BlueTileProject, they noticed that the tiles were more than just a street sign. The blue tiles were historically significant as the first sign of #StreetArt in Houston.  Now, these mosaic art works are a symbol of art and civc image for the city.  The civic image spans across neighborhoods and connects businesses and residents to the local streets of Houston in which they live, work and play.  

Today, the Blue Tile Project is about much more than just documenting the remaining blue tile street signs.  The goal is to expand the project for historical preservation, art/image and local business intiatives.  

About the Tiles:

The earlist known photograph of a blue tile street sign in Houston is from 1928.

Houston is a historical city, rich with artifacts from the past that line our city's streets.  It is documented that the blue tile street signs first appeared on the streets of Houston in the early 1920s.  A young city at that time, these blue tile street signs are the original street markers of the first paved streets of Houston.

 

Although Houston has grown into the 4th largest city in the 

U.S. with population growth and new building contructions, the blue tile street signs have miraculously survived. 

#TBT #ThrowBackThursday on the Corner of Belmont and Sunset in 1932. ◻️🔷◻️🔷◻️🔷 Photo Credit_ Arca
😳 do you see what I see_ 🍊◻️🔷🍊◻️🔷🍊 the Orange Grove Market - 1933 #BlueTileProject #BlueTile #
◻️🔷◻️🔷◻️🔷 _13celsius housed in a 1920s era Mediterranean-style building in an often forgotten por
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✏️ Here is your mission, if you wish to accept it... Go and find this blue tile street sign and take

Historic Preservation

To document and catelog all remaining blue tiles in Houston.

Art & Image

To utilize the blue and white tiles as a civic image of all things Houston

Local Business 

To certify and promote local business